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Improving Leadership Capacity and Capabilities, Part II: Putting Strategy into Action

Improving Leadership Capacity and Capabilities, Part II: Putting Strategy into Action

If there is one thing we have learned in recent years, it is that change is a given in almost every aspect of our lives. It is a constant that is unavoidable, but with it comes opportunities to create a future that meets our shifting needs.

In Part I of our “Improving Leadership Capacity and Capabilities” series, we shared a three-pronged approach to mastering your unique, ever-changing circumstances and becoming an influential leader. Below, we outline how to begin adopting these approaches in your life and workplace, and how the implementation will support you in navigating the contours of change with confidence and courage.

Get Curious

With a beginner’s mind, explore your inner landscape — the hills and valleys of your emotional world.  What are your passions and your values?  What really lights you up and drives you to take action? What triggers you and sets the stage for disruptive thoughts and behaviors? Extend this curiosity to others as well; become an anthropologist fascinated by the inner experiences of others. Having a greater breadth of understanding and tolerance for the complexity of humanity changes how we relate to one another – how we navigate challenging conversations, problem solve, resolve conflict and navigate communal adversity.  

Embrace Accountability

Failure is often seen as something to be avoided at all costs, yet an impossible expectation. Recent wisdom from the likes of business gurus encourages failure as a way of pushing yourself out of your comfort zone and taking risks. Simon Sinek encourages conceptualizing failure as “falling” in order to normalize the experience and highlight getting back up and trying again. Trying something new, falling, getting back up and trying again is a cornerstone of innovation. However, this is only possible when we can embrace accountability with courage and vulnerability.  Reframing failure and adopting the mindset that your shortcomings are simply opportunities for change or growth. It sets the foundation for agile responses and shifting our mental paradigms.

Flexibility

A useful and strategic practice is to hold things lightly. While maintaining direction, focus, and purpose, hold lightly to a desired outcome. Simultaneously embrace letting go and leaning in – show up with drive and dedication, control what you can and be prepared to realign or release when necessary.  

Additionally, being aware of the inherent obstructive qualities of our biases and preconceived notions allows them to be set aside, thus making space for ingenuity, creativity, innovation, and iteration.  

Unlearn and Relearn

So much of who we are and how we show up in our lives is predicated on past experiences. Leveraging strategies that worked before, to navigate a current challenge, is a reasonable approach. However, those tactics may be outdated or inadequate for the disruptions we are facing today. At the onset of the pandemic, government, businesses, and each one of us had to rapidly pivot how we functioned in order to survive circumstances never before encountered. We know firsthand the power of rapidly shifting our mindset for the purpose of survival. Intentionally leaning into the pivot, unlearning and relearning, is an effective leadership strategy. Discovering new ways of working and being is required now more than ever.

Look for opportunities to expand your knowledge base. “You don’t know what you don’t know” reminds us of the presence of potential blind spots and growth edges. Embrace this awareness as an opportunity to expand your capabilities.

Ask “What else is possible?”

Humans brains are designed to fill in the space between what we actually know and what remains a mystery. It is the essence of our survival to be predictive, assessing the potential threat in our environment and rapidly developing a plan for survival. When our survival is actually threatened, this instinctual response is necessary. The propensity to make sense out of our experiences, our interpretation of events or circumstances, becomes maladaptive when we anchor into the “story” as the factual truth. When we divorce ourselves from the “story” and open to the question, “what else is possible?” an endless stream of options unfold.

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

read more

Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

Contact us to get started.

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Consistency: The Foundation of Good Leadership

Consistency: The Foundation of Good Leadership

Recently, I have been really thinking about consistency — or lack thereof — in my life. 

It all started after I received results from a medical test this year. The results were a resounding condemnation of the sedentary lifestyle I have fallen into; the confluence of circumstances that lead to my working hours at my computer in my home office. It occurred to me that I need to reevaluate how I work and where I put ME in the process of accomplishing my work responsibilities. 

The idea of “work-life balance” has been tossed around for years, but it became especially relevant when the pandemic moved most of us out of the office and into our houses. Our work life and personal life became roommates. 

Like many of you, I have made efforts in the last two years to reestablish homeostasis: exercise programs, motivating morning routines, purposeful social time with friends and the like. I’ve tried these things not just once, but several times, and yet nothing seems to stick. As I began to reflect on the pattern of my failed efforts, I saw a common thread: lack of consistency. 

We have all heard things like “consistency is the foundation of good leadership,” “consistency drives performance,” or “consistency builds trust.” In fact, a quick Google search tells us consistency increases profitability, improves your reputation, gains cooperation, and offers stability. Some may argue that consistency is the basis of success for every other leadership behavior. If one is not consistent, the behavior falls short and the impact is blunted. The opposite is also true: consistent application of any leadership behavior is going to amplify its benefits. 

If consistency is the leadership behavior of choice, how do we determine which actions and/or behaviors to focus our consistent attention on? How do we decide what our team or our company needs to best drive success?

Set a Consistent Example 

When exploring consistency as a driver of good leadership, it is important to understand that our ability to lead others begins with our ability to lead ourselves. Developing good self-leadership skills — such as self-awareness, self-management, time management, and clean, clear communication — is imperative. 

How we show up in one area of our lives is endemic of how we show up in other areas. Another way of thinking about this has been inspired by sociologist and author Martha Beck when she said, “how you do anything is how you do everything.” Therefore, it is reasonable when we begin developing consistent, personal habits and behaviors that we become more effective in our self-leadership. This cascades down to how we show up leading our teams and ultimately leading our organizations. 

Consistent Focused Behavior

What behaviors will best support your growth and development? Becoming clear about your motivation — your WHY — informs the behaviors necessary to focus on in order to reach your goals. The behaviors you pick for yourself must be relevant to what you want to grow and develop, in alignment with your core values, and resonant with your current situation. In other words, if your goal is to increase your cardio fitness, you may choose to join a trail running club since you thrive in the wilderness and have more success achieving your goals when you are accountable to others. 

An effective strategy is to choose one focused behavior from each of the following categories: 

Some leaders choose to begin with self-regulatory behaviors, such as: 

  • Establishing morning, afternoon, or evening routines
  • Regular exercise
  • Nutrient consumption
  • Family time 

Others may lean into a personal/professional development

  • Regularly scheduled times for reading or podcasts
  • Writing down thoughts and ideas
  • Attending conferences
  • Participating in mentoring or coaching programs. 

Leaders may also look towards wellness activities, including: 

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Meditation

Be mindful that progress is made when we attend to quality over quantity. It can be tempting to load your plate with multiple behavior goals, however, attempting to optimize or commit to too many behaviors will dilute your efforts and impact consistency, and consistency is the measure of success. You may consider picking a focus area from each of the categories above. For example, you may begin a morning routine that incorporates meditational writing and listening to a business-focused podcast while completing a cardio fitness workout. Or perhaps you begin a fitness program, take a leadership development course and begin each morning with a 15-minute meditation. The options to tailor your leadership development plan are limited only by your imagination.

Once you have successfully established consistent behavior and are seeing the impact of leading yourself, it is time to leverage the momentum and drive behavioral consistency with your team. The leadership strategy you will employ requires a thoughtful approach, considering your unique personal values, the organization’s values, and the needs of your team. Leadership is not a “one size fits all” proposition; be creative and have fun.

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

read more

Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

Contact us to get started.

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Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

When ending a coaching engagement with a leader, I consciously bring our attention to “finishing strong.”

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey. That is because it is important to reflect on who you were and you showed up before the coaching experience, as well as who you are now that the coaching window is closing. The transformation leaders experience is truly remarkable. 

A few questions I recommend leaders ask themselves include:

  • What is the impact of these changes on your leadership capacity, the individuals you lead, your productivity, and your organization? 
  • Are you more or less engaged in the work you do, the people you work with, or the job you perform? 
  • What else in your life has changed as a byproduct of the leadership work you have done?
  • What is the impact on your physical and emotional health, your personal relationships, or your work-life balance?
  • What skills or traits did you leverage to drive the change? 
  • Did you learn something new or reinvigorate something previously mastered? 
  • Did you recognize a superpower that was previously underutilized? 
  • Have you come to see yourself differently through the process of introspection? 
  • How do you imagine these new tools will inform your leadership plan moving forward? 
  • What is your leadership plan to keep the momentum going? 
  • What tools will you continue to evolve, what books might you want to read, what classes might you want to take? 
  • What do you see as the next growth edge to tackle?

Understanding the answers to these questions emphasizes the growth and resulting impact of our work together. Perhaps most importantly, by witnessing and highlighting the effort, fortitude, new skills, and personal attributes, we reenforce and drive ongoing iteration. 

Finishing Strong as a Business

As we come to the end of the year, this same strategy can be applied to your business. Many organizations are looking at “closing the books” on 2022 and beginning to turn their focus to goals, strategies, and action steps for 2023. We at Conscient Strategies argue the most important part of a success plan for 2023 is a thorough 2022 review and a conscious “finishing strong” focus. 

Dan Sullivan, in his book The Gap and The Gain: The High Achievers’ Guide to Happiness, Confidence and Success, explores the concept of measuring “the GAP” versus “the GAIN.” The GAP is the distance from where we are to where our ideal lies; the target just beyond our reach. On the other hand, “the GAIN” measures our current self against our previous self. When we take the time to measure what we have accomplished — the GAIN — we are often stunned by the results. The change of focus is stimulating and sparks motivation which can be leveraged for more success. 

Beginning the process of review for your business requires a broad understanding of what areas of growth matter to you, your team, or your organization. How will you measure success? This is a critical question that only you can answer.

Your success criteria evolves from who you are, what you value and, as a result, what goals you have put in place. The criteria you use to define success becomes an internal reference system that informs focus and action. 

Think about these criteria as buckets that you have been filling throughout the year. These buckets will coordinate with the goals you had set for yourself and your organization, or perhaps areas of priority you identified and pivoted towards as the year progressed. 

The diagram below identifies four aspects for review: 

  • Financial
  • Employee Retention/Satisfaction
  • Personal Growth
  • Customer Satisfaction 

As your awareness expands to consider the GAIN and how full your bucket is now as opposed to at the beginning of 2022, a more balanced picture of success unfolds. 

Understanding Your Reflections

Now that you have a clear picture of what you have achieved this year, what surprises you? What stands out as noteworthy? Is there a link between focus and outcome? Were there areas where you felt like you were pushing a train uphill or places where a little focus resulted in unexpected results? What did you learn and how did you grow? What new tools did you add to your arsenal and what did you let go of? How did you adapt?

By examining your answers to these questions, you have exhaustively considered all the nooks and crannies and pulled forth your valuable nuggets from 2022. You have thoroughly unpacked 2022, ending strong, and are ready to explore what’s next for 2023 with momentum and focus. Let your success, the surprises, and the lessons be the driving force propelling you towards the next iteration of yourself and your organization.

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

read more

Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

Contact us to get started.

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Leadership Lessons from Kindergarten

Leadership Lessons from Kindergarten

I was talking to a client recently who was overcome with the shenanigans occurring in her organization. She bemused, “I wish they would just remember what they learned in Kindergarten.” The conversation continued as we quickly Googled, “All I really need to know I learned in Kindergarten” by Robert Fulghums, and I began to ponder what Kindergarten could teach us about leadership. 

One doesn’t need to have direct reports to be a leader. In fact, leadership begins with one’s ability to lead themselves through the challenges of life, the impact of which cascades across everything they touch. I would argue everyone has the opportunity to be a leader.

We hear daily how the state of humanity is at a critical juncture. Divisiveness and opposition are common; families and friendships are at risk of the polarizing influence of “cancel culture;” employees are leaving organizations en masse; supply chain challenges plague every industry; anger and hatefulness are spewing from every corner. It is all impacting the way we work. 

Could it be that the answer to these troubles is found in Kindergarten? Let’s take a look at the core lessons learned in a Kindergarten classroom.

1. Share everything.

What benefit is a great idea if you keep it to yourself? Holding onto creative ideas stifles innovation. Thought partnering, brainstorming, and mind dumps are a key to generating groundbreaking strategies. Remember, Teamwork makes the Dream work

2. Play fair.

A quick dictionary search reveals the definition of “fair” to be just, equitable, honest, upright, trustworthy, impartial, unbiased, unprejudiced, nondiscriminatory, and nonpartisan. It seems reasonable, then, that “playing fair” is to behave with integrity; to observe the principles of justice; to resist putting people in “Us and Them” buckets; to avoid the temptation of “right and wrong” and “good or evil.” Sit next to one another and listen, really listen to other perspectives. We sometimes refer to this as “listening to understand” as opposed to “listening to respond.”

3. Don’t hit people.

This seems simple enough — after all, it is against the law to physically assault someone. However, “hitting” can also be interpreted as back channel critical conversations about a colleague, a social media post condemning another or denouncing a point of view, elevating a hateful social argument, and/or sending texts or emails eviscerating another’s character or ability. Emotional, verbal, or psychological “hitting” can be profoundly traumatizing. Sticks and stones may in fact break bones, but words can break souls.

4. Clean up your own mess.

Mistakes happen. Sometimes we try something a bit out of the box and it fails. When courageously leading, failure is expected. In fact, some would say, “if you’re not failing, you’re not trying hard enough.” It’s a concept first coined by fitness guru Jillian Michaels that was rapidly assimilated into business and leadership models. So you failed — now what? It is time to be responsible for the decisions you made, accountable for the consequences, to look for the lessons learned, and to quickly adapt and iterate.

5. Don’t take things that aren’t yours.

Respecting the property of others is just the beginning. Looking at it a bit more broadly, another person’s story is not yours, either. In our work lives our eyes and ears may receive information in the form of rumors, assumptions, logical theories, etc. If the story is not about you, it is not yours to share.

6. Say you’re sorry when you hurt somebody.

At some point it is likely that our words and/or actions, whether intentional or not, will cause another to react negatively. Being able and willing to be accountable for your actions is paramount for leaders. Simply saying, “I apologize if my actions or inactions have caused you discomfort,” acknowledges another’s emotions showing empathy and compassion.

7. Wash your hands before you eat and flush.

At first glance, washing your hands and flushing is an obvious respectful human behavior. However, when we look at “clean” as a metaphor for intention, it gets a bit trickier. Our interactions with others, our communications and our behaviors are all motivated by our thoughts, beliefs, and feelings about a situation. Those same thoughts, beliefs and feelings give rise to our intentions. Intentions are the predecessor of integrity, direct communication, problem resolution, and innovation. As a follow-worthy leader, having clean and clear intentions is paramount. To get clarity about your intentions, begin by asking yourself these questions:

•   What is the outcome I would like to see?
•   Does this outcome serve the greater good of all involved?
•   Are my thoughts in alignment with this outcome?
•   Am I approaching this situation from a place of integrity?
•   Are my words and actions clean and clear?

8. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.

Who doesn’t love warm cookies and a glass of cold milk? But what can they teach us about leadership? Nurturing and taking care of yourself is essential, and by being a good role model, you teach others to do the same. When your tank is full, that means you’re well fed, well rested, and you have the ingredients necessary to fully apply yourself to the task of leading. Get outside and walk at lunch; schedule a massage or coffee with a friend; listen to a favorite playlist; take a warm bath, meditate, or exercise. While those are not as tasty as cookies, they are my personal favorites. And of course, drink lots of water.

9. Live a balanced life ~ learn some and think some and draw and paint and sing and dance and play and work a bit every day.

Each of us are unique and complex beings with loves, passions, desires, and dreams. We often refer to this as a “work-life balance.” However, I like to think of it as purely life balance. A holistic approach to life sustains us and enables us to be our best whole selves, regardless of where we are and what we are doing.

10. Take a nap every afternoon.

What do naps and NASA have in common? A study involving napping NASA pilots concluded that just 26 minutes of shuteye improved alertness up to 54% and job-performance by 34%. Additionally, power naps are said to improve memory and learning, relieve stress, boost the immune system, and elevate your mood. The benefits of a short nap are indisputable and sure to support your capability and capacity as a leader.

11. When you go out in the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.

We humans were meant to co-create by living and navigating the world together. These past few years have challenged how we interact and connect. Yet we have all heard stories of resilience, perseverance, and the exceptional efforts to stay connected and care for one another. A follow worthy leader invests in relationships by discovering what is important to others, listening to the joys and the sufferings, expressing concern for their wellbeing, and providing support.

12. Be aware of wonder.

Remember the little seed in the Styrofoam cup: the roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that. Vigilantly look for something that stands out as exceptional or that surprises you. Bring all your friends and colleagues around and share the magic with them. With each shared experience the energy is magnified and momentum is generated. Leverage that momentum to do great things.

13. Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and even the little seed in the Styrofoam cup — they all die. So do we.

Every day is a gift. In fact, every moment is a gift and blessings are abundant. We only need to assume that childlike curiosity and look for the ever-present wonder that life offers. Even in the most challenging times, flowers bloom, butterflies emerge, strangers offer a smile, rain falls, or the sun shines. How can you bring a random act of kindness into your daily routine to enrich someone else’s? Consider sharing a simple gift, spreading a little sunshine. The effort will not only impact the receiver but is sure to alter your day as well.

It has been a while since I was in Kindergarten, and I have to tell you this review has been insightful. Nearly everything I teach about leadership originates in one of these short lessons, and while they sound simple, the truth is they require devotion, practice, patience, and repetition. 

With the curiosity and wonder of a child, I challenge you to imagine what might be possible. How could you leverage these age-old lessons into your leadership strategy? How might you show up differently in all the important realms of your life? How might your significant relationships change? What challenge or passion would you initiate? What impact might you make?

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

read more

Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

Contact us to get started.

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Improving Leadership Capacity and Capabilities, Part I: A Three-Pronged Approach

Improving Leadership Capacity and Capabilities, Part I: A Three-Pronged Approach

Many of us in the workforce have come to realize that  “normal” no longer exists – if it ever existed in the first place.  

Recent work transitions have created a sense of disequilibrium, leaving so many of us  scrambling to find our balance. For others, the transitions have been an opportunity to recalibrate and reconnect with our values and passions. Regardless of where you stand on this adjustment scale, a few things are certain; change is pervasive, and uncertainty defines many aspects of our lives. Like so many other moments in time, leaders have to rethink how they stay relevant and create value in an uncertain environment. 

There are benefits of operating in an environment of significant disruption.  One such benefit is the opportunity to create a future state that more adequately meets your needs and the needs of your organization.  Your workplace is not a set destination, but rather a continuum of rapidly changing dynamics that require mental flexibility, emotional state awareness and regulation and versatility.  

As we grow, we trade our childlike sense of wonder, curiosity, and spontaneity for fixed preferences.  We stop pushing the edges of our own comfort and our growth slows, eventually plateauing as we become specialists in our personal and professional lives.  But the world does not stay still.

As the leader of your own life and your organization, being able to navigate any given marketplace requires a unique set of tools to strengthen your capabilities as well as your capacity. The tools are available to anyone who is willing to challenge their mind and push past their current perspectives. Your mind, and the lens you use to view your world, are your greatest resources.  

Here is a three-pronged approach to positioning yourself to master your unique, ever-changing circumstances and become an influential leader.  

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence (EQ), a concept first coined by Peter Salavoy and John Mayer in the article “Emotional Intelligence” in 1990 and later expounded upon by Dan Goleman in his 1995 book titled Emotional Intelligence, is defined as our ability to recognize, understand, and manage our own emotions and recognize, understand, and influence the emotions of others.  It is our ability to perceive and understand our own emotions and those of others; to express our emotions effectively and to manage our emotions.  The science of emotions has shown that our emotions guide our thinking and our behavior and that these abilities are not part of our personality.  The theory of emotional intelligence postulates that these traits are more like skills that can be improved over time when given attention and training.  

When we have a greater awareness of our emotional responses, we are able to see the impact those emotions have on our thoughts and how those thoughts are impacting our behavior.  Viktor Frankl, an Austrian Psychologist, Holocaust survivor, and founder of logotherapy, wrote “Between Stimulus and response there is a space.  In that space is our power to choose a response.  In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” He recognized the power of a response born from self-management, taking space to recognize, understand and manage one’s emotional response.  The growth and freedom he speaks of, is the result of expanding emotional intelligence.  

Our ability to understand and navigate our own emotions and the emotions of others, and to respond appropriately to challenges, enables us to develop healthy relationships. Leveraging those relationships in challenging times increases success in overcoming adversity.  Additionally, increasing our EQ affords a personal awareness that opens the door to self-reflection and self-exploration — a growth mindset.

Growth Mindset

Growth Mindset is a concept identified by Dr. Carol Dweck nearly 30 years ago.  In contrast to a Fixed Mindset, people with a Growth Mindset believe achievements are about effort, not simply inherent talent; they learn from mistakes and find value in criticism; they believe intelligence and ability can be enhanced through effort, learning, and resolve.  People with a Growth Mindset lean into challenging tasks that stretch their current level of performance.

A Growth Mindset supports increased resiliency when faced with setbacks.  Seeing adversity as a challenge to overcome or a lesson to be learned drives persistence and determination, increasing the likelihood of achieving one’s goals. 

In the face of uncertainty or seemingly insurmountable changes, someone with a Growth Mindset is more likely to see opportunities to learn, grow, or pivot rather than feel overwhelmed or threatened by potential failure.  The Growth Mindset creates fertile ground for creativity, innovation, and adaptation.

When you face adversity with a Growth Mindset, you believe that your capacity and capability are unlimited with the right type of effort and attention.  This positive attitude fosters optimism and confidence when future challenges are encountered. How a person faces challenges, how they process failure and how they adapt and evolve is regulated by their mindset, thus increasing resiliency, creativity, and innovation.

Adaptability Quotient

Adaptability Quotient (AQ) is a more recent hypothesis founded on the belief that a person’s level of adaptability can be enhanced and measured.  The importance of our capacity to adapt is not revolutionary and in fact takes root in Darwin’s theory of evolution.  However, as our world has become increasingly complex, uncertain, and volatile, our ability to deftly navigate these conditions has become indispensable.  Notably, our ability to learn, grow, and re-calibrate, not only after a setback, but as a predictive strategy, will drive our success.  

An individual with a high AQ will seek new learning experiences, increasing knowledge and/or skills necessary to navigate challenges more effectively.  They will look at multiple perspectives, update mental models and beliefs, and test assumptions.  By managing their stress levels, time, energy, and attention, they will have increased resiliency, thus fostering an awareness that problems and conflicts are opportunities waiting to be explored.  

Most importantly however, is that adaptability drives the question, “what else is possible?” This one simple question embodies all three pillars – Emotional Intelligence, Growth Mindset and Adaptability. Curiosity and inquisitiveness – the childlike sense of wonder, coupled with a passion for adventure, positions us to be agile in creating our future state.  

Putting it all together

How effectively a person can lead themselves and others through these tumultuous and fortuitous times will depend on their EQ, Growth Mindset, and AQ.  As you can see in the Venn Diagram on Page 1, all three of these pillars are intersecting, each influencing the other and all strengthening the overall impact on leadership.  A well-developed EQ sets the foundation for embracing our growth edges and/or blind spots (Growth Mindset).  A Growth Mindset drives inquisition, a propensity to take on challenges with confidence and a belief that potential is ubiquitous (AQ).  Higher levels of AQ support a willingness to override old data with new information, effectively unlearning in order to approach challenges with a beginner’s mind.  To have a beginner’s mind requires believing in one’s innate capacity (Growth Mindset) and self-awareness (EQ). 

Understanding the interconnectedness of these three distinct mental fitness strategies, and striving to improve mental flexibility, emotional state awareness, regulation, and versatility, all while grounded in a Growth Mindset, will increase your success in leading yourself and your organization during any time of change, uncertainty and work-life challenges.

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

read more

Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

Contact us to get started.

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Giving the Gift of Well-Being in the Workplace

Giving the Gift of Well-Being in the Workplace

Does your organization have a wellness program? Is it meeting your employees needs? What are you—as a leader—doing to foster well-being for yourself and those with whom you work? There are several simple practices that you could incorporate into your organizational rhythm that would make a difference for you and your team.  

Why Well-Being Matters
According to SHRM, “research shows that employee health status directly influences work behavior, attendance, and on-the-job performance,” (Chenoweth, 2011). Incorporating well-being practices into the daily life of work is a way to demonstrate care for your teammates and their whole selves, not just what they accomplish on a task or project. Well-being practices can provide opportunities for team building when participation is high, and they have the potential to be a positive influence on interpersonal dynamics
.

Ways of Well-Being at Work
Well-being in the workplace can take many forms. Here are a few examples from my own practices:

A Gratitude Practice
A simple way to start incorporating well-being into the workplace is to begin a gratitude practice. Did you know that expressing gratitude is often as beneficial to the sender as it is to the receiver? There are many ways you could begin a gratitude practice, so reflect on what might work best for you. Here are few suggestions:

  • Send gratitude texts, emails, calls, or cards. Take time to reflect on what and whom you are grateful for and create the time to send each person a note of thanks, whether it’s in the moment, at the end of the day, or the end of the week. Don’t get hung up on the method, just do it. Research shows that there isn’t a significant difference in feelings of happiness based on the method of expression of gratitude.
  • Start meetings with a round robin of gratitude. Ask teammates to share thanks for coworkers to start your meetings on a positive note.
  • Write a letter of gratitude to one of your mentors or a close colleague who supports you. Even if you don’t send it, it will still have a positive impact on you, but of course sending it will positively impact the other person too.

Walking Meetings
Walking meetings are an alternative to sit-down meetings for one-on-ones or small group meetings. Being in motion changes the energy level in positive ways and can help get those creative juices flowing. (Think about all those great ideas you’ve had when you’ve been engaged in movement!) Keep in mind that team members have different physical abilities and those who choose the walking option will move at different paces.

Mindfulness Moments
Can you spare five minutes? Then you can take a mindful break and you can invite your team to join you. In a previous position, when my team returned to the office in June 2020, it was amidst a lot of uncertainty and stress. As we prepared for a new academic year with continued unknowns and constant change, I wanted a way to foster resilience in the team. I had begun a personal daily meditation on my own and found it helpful. I decided to offer a voluntary “mindfulness moment” during the workday when we could come together and pause. Every team member participated, even the ones who had to continue working remotely, and it was a great way to bring us together when we were working in different locations. We experimented with different times of day and different kinds of meditation. I used several different apps to make it easy to run. Without fail and without any prompting at the end of every session, someone expressed gratitude for the time to pause together.

The Gift That Keeps on Giving
Well-being at work can be the gift that keeps on giving all year long. Better than the jelly of the month club, it shows your team that you really care, and it costs you nothing but time and attention. As a bonus, it’s a gift that gives back to you! As you navigate the busy holiday season, take some time for well-being for yourself and consider giving the gift of well-being to your team.

Works Cited
Chenoweth, D. (2011). Promoting Employee Well-Being: Wellness Strategies to Improve Health, Performance and the Bottom Line. https://www.shrm.org/foundation/ourwork/initiatives/the-aging-workforce/Documents/Promoting%20Employee%20Well-Being.pdf

Hopper, E. (2021). What is the best way to deliver a thank-you? Greater Good Magazine. https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/what_is_the_best_way_to_deliver_a_thank_you?utm_source=pocket&&utm_medium=email&&utm_campaign=pockethits

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You might also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

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Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

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Warning: Assumptions Ahead

Warning: Assumptions Ahead

We make assumptions all the time—especially when we assume that everyone else is just like us.

For example…

  • If you’re excited about an opportunity, you might assume that others ought to be enthusiastic as well.
  • If you feel left out in a particular situation, you might assume that everyone else would also feel left out.

When we remember that not everyone is like us, we enter a scenario with a more open mind. What if you approached a situation with curiosity rather than assumptions? How would that reframe what you expected? How would that shift your original approach?

 When we set our assumptions aside and bring forward our curiosity about others, we create a safe space for meaningful dialogue.

Making assumptions limits your thinking.
Being curious and asking questions expands your own perspective and creates space for a more open conversation. It invites others involved in the conversation to shape your understanding. As a leader, understanding others is critical to effectiveness.

Staying curious and open-minded is critical to effective meetings.
Have you ever attended a meeting thinking, “oh, I know exactly how she’s going to react to this” or “I need to get my ideas out there before he starts in again.” Have you ever discovered later that you had misinterpreted a coworker’s tone or the intention behind something they shared during a meeting? How does making these types of assumptions in meetings affect how you act and react? Instead, try entering a meeting space with curiosity. Rather than making assumptions based on what you think you know about your coworkers, try asking open-ended questions to advance the conversation.

There is one exception to the rule of suspending assumptions—the need to assume positive intent.
When we assume that everyone comes to the conversation with good intentions, we will be less likely to make additional assumptions about what others think or mean throughout the conversation or in subsequent interactions. When we set our assumptions aside and bring forward our curiosity about a subject or about how others are showing up, we create space for meaningful dialogue. Oftentimes, this then leads to increased collaboration and innovation across teams and organizations.

 As a leader, understanding others is critical to effectiveness.

By questioning your own assumptions, you open your mind to alternate possibilities.
This reminds you that you’re seeing the situation through your lens, while the other person’s experience is filtered through their particular—and different—lens. #SNOITPMUSSA

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

read more

Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

Contact us to get started.

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Deal Makers Interview Series: Jack Hendler

Deal Makers Interview Series: Jack Hendler

In the Deal Makers Series, we interview leaders, experts, and innovators in the Merger & Acquisition and the Private Equity space about how they get successful deals done. The series highlights perspectives of investors and buy and sell-side advisors working across industries and geographies.

For our most recent installment, we interviewed Jack Hendler, CEO of Avalon Net Worth, an independent investment banking firm. Jack holds a degree from NYU Stern School of Business and founded Net Worth Solutions in 1999.

CS: What is your current role, and can you tell us a little about how you got there?

I am the CEO of Avalon Net Worth, an independent investment banking firm. I have the pleasure and honor of heading up the Merger and Acquisition division of the firm. I started the Net Worth Solutions part of the company back in 1999 and then merged with Avalon Securities probably eight or nine years ago. I met the owner and CEO of Avalon 25 years ago on a transaction where we were representing clients on opposite sides. Over the years, we developed a great relationship and decided to merge our companies, becoming Avalon Net Worth. At the time of the merger, Net Worth was an M&A company; joining forces with Avalon allowed us to expand our impact as Broker-Dealers. Our clients represent a mix of private and public companies.

CS: Tell us about your experience in M&A, as an investment banker and having done it yourself.

Prior to merging with Avalon, I had started and sold two companies and I was looking for the third leg of the stool—my third opportunity in life. We operate in the M&A business with “middle-market” companies who have enterprise values of $25 million to $500 million. I wanted to change the client experience. I believed I could make an impact by helping someone recognize their company had value, understand what that value is, and choose the best financial venue for selling their company.

So I started Net Worth Solutions and now, it is 24 years later, and I am still having a good time. I have a passion for working with financially troubled companies, helping them find solutions, and easing the stress in their lives.

CS: Help us understand what you do for the companies you work for.

It starts with a personal meeting—obviously in the last two years with COVID, it has been more difficult. But whether it is on Zoom or an in-person meeting, I believe it is critical to connect with the client, to discover what motivates them to seek our support. We get a clear picture of the client’s needs both emotionally and practically.

Whether clients want to sell their business, acquire another business, or need growth capital for their existing business, we are one of the few investment banks who help companies who are financially stressed.

Not all companies need the same solutions. One company may need to sell, another should be making acquisitions to round out their businesses. And yet another may not be large enough in volume or profitability to bring to market. If the company has stress, we look at what created the stress and what the value of the company would be in somebody else’s infrastructure.

By taking the time and interest in the beginning, we can be flexible and creative with options.

CS: How do support your clients in preparing themselves and their company to sell? Specifically, do you address operations, financials, or culture?

For this portion of the transaction, we look to professionals like yourselves to address culture, organizational strategy, and prepare the company for the transition in leadership.

As far as the financials, perhaps we would have a CFO get their books ready for an examination. Since we are experts in marketing the company to the right buyer for maximum purchase price, we put our focus there.

CS: You’ve worked on a variety of deals and acquisitions from both sides of the table. What are some of the factors that you think contribute to a successful merger or acquisition?

Getting the seller clear about their choices and prepared for what they can anticipate is the first step.

Additionally, we have implemented presenting a Quality of Earning Report. When a potential buyer is looking at the company specs, they will notice an independent auditor has completed a financial assessment and has identified any relevant issues. When it comes to evaluating an ROI and completing the actual purchase and sale agreement, the buyer can feel confident they have the information necessary to support their decisions.

Along the lines of supporting the seller and buyer in their transaction, we have become known for including a Working Capital Assessment. We discuss the working capital that is necessary for the company and evaluate what is available. We help determine how excess working capital should be handled. Completing the Working Capital Assessment has saved us from the retrenching or renegotiation that occurs in many sales.

Our experiences have taught us that the attention we give to the Quality of Earning Report and the Working Capital Assessment supports our successful closing rate, which is over 90%.

CS: From your perspective, what are the factors that really drive the success of the acquisition?

One of the main reasons we have success is we bring the appropriate buyer to the table. It is important for the buyer to really understand the philosophy of the business they are acquiring and hopefully, it mirrors the philosophy of their existing business. Sharing the philosophical perspective supports the transition, ultimately decreasing potential unintended roadblocks.

When we have recognized a cultural difference between the two companies, we acknowledge the different operating styles, different philosophies, or different structures, and suggest they receive support from professionals who will help them integrate and merge properly. We make it clear and ensure they understand the complexities and the need for professional support. We can see where there are potential issues, and we highlight the need to be proactive in addressing these issues for the sale and acquisition to be successful.

CS: How do you go about identifying those cultural differences?

Interestingly, they begin to show up in the conversations and due diligence efforts by both parties; either the questions they ask or the way they answer questions. Since we are actively involved in those conversations, we are attuned to potential risk factors and listen intently for expectations or conflicting perspectives.

In general, we want to explore whether the selling company will stay intact, which—if any—current managers will remain in place, will there be a transition of power, or the magnitude of the infrastructure transition. These answers help us determine if the companies are parallel in their thought processes and what kind of support they may need moving forward after the acquisition is complete.

CS: How do you evaluate the leaders who will be moving forward for their fit in the organization?

At the onset, we look to understand the principal’s role and history with the company; did they start the company, did they inherit the company, what generation of inheritance is there, what portion of the company are they involved in, do they meet with clients, do they take care of financial aspects? We want a clear picture of their strengths and potential areas of weakness.

Additionally, in our conversations we are evaluating the fit for leadership by observing their overall attitude, how they handle stress, the respect they show during meetings, how they make decisions, the depth of their company awareness, do their day-to-day activities match their title, and their presence. Presence—or lack thereof—is very telling.

CS: Have you ever seen a situation where the leadership or the culture negatively impacts the success after the transaction closes?

Yes, I have seen it happen. Adjusting to a new leadership dynamic is often more difficult than anticipated, and surprises do happen. We may have overestimated synergies, the buyer may have mis-aligned expectations, and/or unexpected cultural or leadership issues may arise.

CS: How about on the flip side? Where have you seen strong leadership or cultures drive growth?

Absolutely! When a buyer can enhance productivity or the management team could save costs or drive the company in a positive direction, subsequently it puts the seller at ease. If the acquiring company brings an asset the selling company is currently missing, it becomes something we can leverage. When we recognize how to best match the seller and the buyer, everyone is happy.

CS: Not only have you helped other companies, but you have merged companies yourself. When you merged, what was the most difficult part?

That first morning after closing the deal… I parked my car in the same Manhattan garage I had parked in for years. I walked to the corner, and I became very emotional. I felt lost and did not know where I belonged. I had lost my “place” and did not know what was next. It took some time to find my balance, re-group, and discover what was next; ultimately, Net Worth Solutions was born.

CS: When Net Worth and Avalon came together, were there difficulties after that transaction?

Yeah, a bit. Avalon’s owner and I were relatively successful running our own businesses, and when we worked on a transaction together it was a positive experience. I was attracted to their strengths and attitudes about business and running their firm. Over the years, I had developed a great deal of respect for them and saw the potential in joining forces. I knew our personalities were a bit different, as were our philosophies. It was those differences that I believed would benefit our merger.

However, adjusting to the differences was more difficult for me than I expected. It was the very differences I admired so much that were the most difficult aspects for me to integrate. What attracted me most to my business partner was exactly what I needed to adjust to. I discovered that as I became more flexible, I was able to step back and allow the differences to coexist. Our differences have made us stronger as leaders and our company more successful.

CS: As you think about the next few years, what are you most excited about?

We are one of the few investment banks that support people who are under financial stress. I have met past clients on the street, and I nearly did not recognize them. They no longer carry the weight of stress and anxiety. They give me a hug and say, “thank you for helping me save my company, thank you for helping me save my home and my mortgage.” I look forward to meeting and supporting new clients, helping them see what is possible, and ultimately resolving their struggle.

We’re so grateful to Jack for sharing his expertise and insights on M&A. Check back here for more future installments of the Deal Makers Series!

Learn more about Leadership & Culture Due Diligence »

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Deal Makers Interview Series: Scott Taylor

Deal Makers Interview Series: Scott Taylor

We interviewed Scott Taylor, attorney and principal at SmolenPlevy—a practice primarily focused on general corporate and business law, mergers and acquisitions, transactional planning and structuring, and business succession and exit planning.

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Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

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Decoding Body Language and Energy Shifts

Decoding Body Language and Energy Shifts

Have you ever observed what is not being said in a conversation?

For instance: you walk into a meeting and notice an immediate, intense silence, as though all the air has been sucked out of the room.

Or you’re in a conversation with someone, and you feel there is a disconnect between what the person is saying and how they are acting. “I’m excited to tackle this new project,” says a colleague, but they avoid eye contact, shift nervously from side-to-side, repeatedly rub their brow.

Body language and energy shifts can provide clues that something is being left unsaid. Is the energy and body language aligned with the words being spoken? If not, there’s a good chance something else is happening under the surface. If you really want to know what the other person is thinking, you need to ask about the disconnect between what you are hearing and what you are seeing or feeling.

Body Language

A disconnect between what is being said and what you are seeing in the other person’s body language can indicate a feeling that is not being expressed. Interpretations of body language may vary across cultures and individuals. A few popular interpretations include:

 Signs of negative feelings (such as frustration or disappointment) can include folded arms, tension in the face, or little eye contact.

Signs of boredom or disengagement are often shown by slumped posture, staring into space, fidgeting, or doodling.

Smiling is nearly universally considered an indication of openness and positive feelings, as is an open posture.

Energy Shifts

An energy shift can be subtle or dramatic, and it is usually a clue to a change in thinking or feeling about what is under discussion. The energy is often not verbalized right away, but you can prompt a verbalization of the thought or feeling by vocalizing an observation about the energy shift, asking with curiosity what the person is thinking or feeling differently.

For example, to highlight the disconnect in what you observe and what you are hearing, you may ask:

  • I notice that you don’t look very comfortable right now—is there something I can help clarify?
  • I just said a lot, what does this bring up for you?
  • You seem distracted, would you like to reschedule this for another time?

Getting curious about the other person’s body language and energy shifts can be a way to understand their thinking and feelings on a deeper level. Asking about a disconnect can be a way to show empathy and care or concern. When you pay attention to what is not being said, you ensure that the whole person is being heard and seen.

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

read more

Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

Contact us to get started.

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Connection before Correction

Connection before Correction

When I was working on my master’s in education, we were taught that if you can’t control the behavior of your students in the classroom then you can’t teach. At this point, I had been working with children for many years and knew this to be true. I was fortunate to be trained by an amazing professor that leaned into positive (vs. punitive) techniques that would show the students you cared about them yet pushed them to be their best. I remember this professor even saying… these tips work outside of the classroom too! As a Leadership Coach 20 years later, I still use these skills to help leaders with their team.

Connection before correction is imperative to lead people. When people feel connected to you, they will support you, they will listen to you. Good examples of this are in politics, religion, and even fast food. Why do you support a certain candidate? Why do you go that particular place of worship? Why do you go to your favorite spot for coffee or fast food? The answer is quite simple. You feel connected to them, so in turn you support them. The opposite is also true, if you do not feel connected, you will spend your time and money somewhere else. This concept is easy to understand yet so easy to overlook.

Deadlines, chaos, and disruption typically puts leadership in fix-it mode. This mode can start the hamster wheel effect of get it done and lose sight of the ones doing the work. This may have short term wins, but the long-term effects will take its toll. I have watched countless leaders lean into the job and not their people all with negative effects. Once a team member realizes that leadership is only interested in the outcome, they will eventually feel undervalued and frustrated.

So how do you connect with your team? Here are 3 tips that are simple and effective:
  1. Observation – Watch your team. Take time to see what is going right and make sure to tell them the good stuff!
  2. Communication – As Brene Brown states in her Dare to Lead book, clear is kind and unclear is unkind. Use clear and concise words to let your team know what you need from them.
  3. Care – Do you genuinely care about your team? Take 5 minutes before or after a meeting to connect with your teammates. Find areas where you share common ground and connect through whatever is that links you.

Now that you are connected with your team, let’s talk about correction. Using one the examples above let’s go back to your favorite coffee shop. You are greeted warmly by your barista, you place your order, and then proceed to talk the news of the day – one of which was their flat tire this a.m. on the way to work. You begin to leave when you realize that you received the wrong order. You have two options – walk out and let it go or return to the counter and have the barista fix the order. What do you choose? At work, you get to decide what issues you want to tackle and which ones you do not. Because you have connected with your team, you will know the right time to extend grace and the right time to tackle the issue at hand. Because you have a relationship with the team member you will know how to best talk to the team member to be understood and heard.

Now take the same 3 tips above and apply it when correction is needed – but only after connection has happened:
  1. Observation – Take time to understand the whole picture of the correction needed. Is your teammate just having a bad day? Is this a repetitive problem? Is this problem within their control? Getting a clear picture will help you hone in on what really needs to be corrected.
  2. Communication – Ask as many clarifying questions as possible to understand the situation. Use the clear is kind principle mentioned above. State what is expected and make sure your teammate understands what is expected of them.
  3. Care – Take actions that reflect the needs the person in front of you. One size does not fit all, so make sure that the correction is attainable for that person. Always make time to reconnect to the goal and support the person in the best way you can.

Correction is necessary, but connection will make it much easier to continue to build your team.

Conscient Strategies was founded with the idea that every organization is capable of thriving through change. With a focus on strategy development, program implementation, workplace dynamics, and leadership development, Conscient Strategies equips leaders with the tools necessary to continuously navigate the constancy of change in ways that not only benefit their team, but, equally as important, their business outcomes as well. From mergers to c-suite changes to sudden or explosive growth, organizations turn to Conscient Strategies when change is threatening their financial health and cultural wellbeing.

Based in Washington, D.C., Conscient Strategies is comprised of a talented group of consultants, executive coaches, strategists, and account executives. The team has worked with organizations of all sizes in the private, federal, and non-profit sectors across the United States and Internationally.

You may also be interested in:

Finishing Strong

Finishing Strong

Endings are just as important, if not more so, than any other stage of the coaching journey.

read more

Ready to grow a stronger organization? 

Contact us to get started.

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